Carver after school students learn fencing at Side By Side Charter School!

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Candlewood Fencing Center in Danbury is the premier fencing academy in Connecticut and now they are bringing their elite skills to teach Carver after school students. Candlewood is Connecticut's oldest and most decorated fencing club; they are ranked the highest in Connecticut by National Fencing Club Rankings' list of "Best Fencing Clubs".

Though they may be little Musketeers now, some of our students may love the sport enough to become Candlewood World Team Members, National Champions and even in time NCAA Recruits. See these photos taken today of one of their instructors offering tailored instruction ensuring each student's learning, growth and fun.

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Despite having roots based in swordsmanship, fencing is a modern Olympic sport that has grown from its historical genesis. Fencing takes place between two competitors, and is largely based on striking your opponent with a blunt weapon while avoiding being hit yourself. There is a significant breadth of rules that govern when and how hitting an opponent scores a point that varies between the three weapons: Foil, Sabre, and Épée. This creates unique strategies for each weapon and little crossover of style between the three disciplines.

Fencing demands explosive acceleration and even long individual touches and exchanges do not usually last longer than 30 seconds. Being able to maintain complete focus during short periods of explosive movement is key to success. Additionally, in terms of the length of the events, the most fencing time you can have for a bout is 10 minutes, assuming that the bout goes to full time. Those 10 minutes are broken up by two 1 minute breaks.

Fencing has a long traditional history as an Olympic sport. It was one of only nine sports to be featured in the first modern Olympics in 1896. Fencing is as deep-seated in the Olympic tradition as is wrestling or gymnastics. As young fencers begin to fence and become more competitive, the Olympics is the final dream of each young competitive fencer; it’s the highest level of achievement in the sport.