The Art in STEAM Education after school at Brien McMahon High School

Edgar Garcia, Special Education Teacher at Brien McMahon High School and Lead Program Coordinator for Carver’s after school program there, is organizing the tie-dying project with two of his students

Edgar Garcia, Special Education Teacher at Brien McMahon High School and Lead Program Coordinator for Carver’s after school program there, is organizing the tie-dying project with two of his students

Here are some images of Carver after school students at Brien McMahon High School learning how to tie-dye t-shirts.

The STEM to STEAM movement has been taking root across the country over the past several years and is surging forward as a positive mode of action to truly meet the needs of a 21st century economy.  STEM alone misses several key components that many employers, educators, and parents have voiced as critical for our children to thrive in the present and rapidly approaching future.

STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking. The end results are students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. These are the innovators, educators, leaders, and learners of the 21st century!

Tie-dye, the technique of creating distinctive spirals of neon color most often seen on T-shirts, doesn't discriminate. Anyone can produce an appealing tie-dye design. Did you know that tie-dye techniques date back to Pre-Columbian times, and Peru in 500-800 A.D.? Shibori is another form of tie-dye that originated in Japan in the 8th century.

The wonderful colors and designs of this method have intrigued many generations across many cultures but can be made easily and with simple household ingredients. This student-friendly activity never gets old.

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