Norwalk River Rowing Association is teaching Carver campers how to crew!

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Thanks to the generous financial support of long-time Carver board member and advocate, Dick Whitcomb, Carver summer students are learning how to crew!

The Summer Learning classes are non-competitive rowing programs for our Norwalk High School Summer Academy (rising 9th graders) led by Maureen Ireland. Jeffrey Thompson is the Director at Norwalk River Rowing. The emphasis is on learning rowing technique, boat handling, physical conditioning, teamwork, and fun!

Carver students enjoy sessions which incorporate on-land and water rowing with instruction with warm up exercises and camp activities in 2 week sessions with classes 4 days per week. After completing the Learn-to-Row class, our students are ready to move up to the Development Experienced Team.

The Norwalk River Rowing Association (NRRA) is a non-profit organization which promotes a lifelong passion for the sport of rowing among its Adult and Youth members who love Competition, Teamwork, Excellence, and Fun. They are dedicated to providing educational and athletic opportunities for the youth of our communities, and promoting excellence in the sport of rowing for all age groups. Their goal is to be the preeminent community-based rowing center in the northeast United States.

The Norwalk River Rowing Association was founded in 1986 by Ralph E. Sloan, former Norwalk Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Norman J. Weinberger, Norwalk pediatrician, and a few local residents. Initially, our goals were modest: to provide rowing opportunities for adults and youth and to develop a competitive high school program. What began as a small group of enthusiastic rowers on Long Island Sound now serves over four hundred people a year, from throughout southwest Connecticut and into New York, ranging in age from twelve to well into the eighties. Many of the founding members remain active participants at the NRRA today.

Thank you, NRRA for giving Carver kids a summer to remember!

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Jim Schaffer